Illustration of Clams

Clams

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Harvest Method

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Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Chinese Razor

Sinonovacula constricta

Method

Farmed

Off-bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Chinese Razor

Sinonovacula constricta

Method

Farmed

Bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Northern Razor

Siliqua patula

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

Canada - British Columbia, Northeast Pacific Ocean

Overall Rating

4.077 / 5

Summary

Abundance: Stock has not been formally assessed, but there are no indications that overfishing is occurring.


Bycatch: Harvest method allows fishers to be highly selective, returning undersized clams or any potential bycatch to the water alive.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Northern Razor

Siliqua patula

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

U.S. - Quinault Indian Reservation, Northeast Pacific Ocean

Overall Rating

4.077 / 5

Summary

Bycatch: Harvest method allows fishers to be highly selective, returning undersized clams or any potential bycatch to the water alive.


Management: Highly effective utilizings best available information to inform decision making and encorporating high amounts of stakeholder inclusion in the management process.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Northern Quahog

Mercenaria mercenaria

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

U.S. - Rhode Island, Northwest Atlantic Ocean

Overall Rating

3.782 / 5

Summary

Abundance: Some data is available to inform an understanding but stock status, but overall status is unknown, however, it is unlikely fishery severely impacting populations.


Bycatch: Harvest method is selective and incurs minimal to zero bycatch. In addition, incidental catch can often be returned alive.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Northern Quahog

Mercenaria mercenaria

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

U.S. - North Carolina, Northwest Atlantic Ocean

Overall Rating

3.366 / 5

Summary

Abundance: Stock status unknown, however, it is unlikely fishery severely impacting populations.


Bycatch: Harvest method is selective and incurs minimal to zero bycatch. In addition, incidental catch can often be returned alive.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Softshell

Mya arenaria

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

Canada - Northwest Atlantic Ocean (excluding Quebec)

Overall Rating

3.302 / 5

Summary

Bycatch: Fishers use hand tools such as rakes, shovels, and picks to capture clams in shallow waters and mudflats. These fishing methods allow fishers to be highly selective about their catch, making bycatch minimal, and unwanted species are returned to the water alive.


Abundance: Formal stock assessments do not exists for this species, and it's unknown if overfishing is occurring.


Management: Measures are in place to prevent overfishing, but their effectiveness is unknown.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Razor

Sinonovacula spp.

Method

Farmed

Off-bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Softshell

Mya arenaria

Method

Farmed

Bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Softshell

Mya arenaria

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

U.S. - Massachusetts, Northwest Atlantic Ocean (Softshell clam fishery)

Overall Rating

3.302 / 5

Summary

Bycatch: Fishers use hand tools such as rakes, shovels, and picks to capture clams in shallow waters and mudflats. These fishing methods allow fishers to be highly selective about their catch, making bycatch minimal, and unwanted species are returned to the water alive.


Abundance: Formal stock assessments do not exists for this species, and it's unknown if overfishing is occurring.


Management: Measures are in place to prevent overfishing and enforcement is highly effective.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Softshell

Mya arenaria

Method

Farmed

Off-bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Softshell

Mya arenaria

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

Canada - Northwest Atlantic Ocean (Maritimes)

Overall Rating

3.302 / 5

Summary

Bycatch: Fishers use hand tools such as rakes, shovels, and picks to capture clams in shallow waters and mudflats. These fishing methods allow fishers to be highly selective about their catch, making bycatch minimal, and unwanted species are returned to the water alive.


Abundance: Formal stock assessments do not exists for this species, and it's unknown if overfishing is occurring.


Management: Measures are in place to prevent overfishing, but their effectiveness is unknown.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Razor

Sinonovacula spp.

Method

Farmed

Bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Softshell

Mya arenaria

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

Canada - Quebec, Northwest Atlantic Ocean

Overall Rating

3.52 / 5

Summary

Bycatch: Fishers use hand tools such as rakes, shovels, and picks to capture clams in shallow waters and mudflats. These fishing methods allow fishers to be highly selective about their catch, making bycatch minimal, and unwanted species are returned to the water alive.


Abundance: Assessments are regularly conducted and utilize information on commercial catches, fishing effort, catch rates, and size structure of clams to evaluate status of populations. However, some data regarding fishing effort and catch rates are somewhat uncertain.


Management: Measures are in place to prevent overfishing and enforcement is highly effective.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Northern Quahog

Mercenaria mercenaria

Method

Farmed

Bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Northern Quahog

Mercenaria mercenaria

Method

Farmed

Off-bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Blood

Scapharca broughtonii

Method

Farmed

Off-bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Lyrate Hard

Meretrix lyrata

Method

Farmed

Off-bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Hard

Meretrix lusoria

Method

Farmed

Bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Hard

Meretrix lusoria

Method

Farmed

Off-bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Blood

Scapharca broughtonii

Method

Farmed

Bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Japanese Carpet Shell

Venerupis spp.

Method

Farmed

Bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Lyrate Hard

Meretrix lyrata

Method

Farmed

Bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Pacific Littleneck

Protothaca staminea

Method

Farmed

Off-bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Northern Quahog

Mercenaria mercenaria

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

U.S. - Massachusetts, Northwest Atlantic Ocean

Overall Rating

3.302 / 5

Summary

Abundance: Stock status unknown, however, it is unlikely fishery severely impacting populations.


Bycatch: Harvest method is selective and incurs minimal to zero bycatch. In addition, incidental catch can often be returned alive.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Northern Quahog

Mercenaria mercenaria

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

Canada - Northwest Atlantic Ocean: Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence

Overall Rating

3.302 / 5

Summary

Bycatch: Fishers use hand tools such as rakes, shovels, and picks to capture clams in shallow waters and mudflats. These fishing methods allow fishers to be highly selective about their catch, making bycatch minimal, and unwanted species are returned to the water alive.


Abundance: Formal stock assessments do not exists for this species, and it's unknown if overfishing is occurring.


Management: Measures are in place to prevent overfishing, but their effectiveness is unknown.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Northern Quahog

Mercenaria mercenaria

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

U.S. - New York, Northwest Atlantic Ocean

Overall Rating

3.302 / 5

Summary

Abundance: Stock status unknown, however, it is unlikely fishery severely impacting populations.


Bycatch: Harvest method is selective and incurs minimal to zero bycatch. In addition, incidental catch can often be returned alive.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Japanese Carpet Shell

Venerupis spp.

Method

Farmed

Off-bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Pacific Littleneck

Protothaca staminea

Method

Farmed

Bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Softshell

Mya arenaria

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

U.S. - Maine, Northwest Atlantic Ocean (Softshell clam fishery)

Overall Rating

3.302 / 5

Summary

Bycatch: Fishers use hand tools such as rakes, shovels, and picks to capture clams in shallow waters and mudflats. These fishing methods allow fishers to be highly selective about their catch, making bycatch minimal, and unwanted species are returned to the water alive.


Abundance: Formal stock assessments do not exists for this species, and it's unknown if overfishing is occurring.


Management: Measures are in place to prevent overfishing and enforcement is highly effective.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Northern Razor

Siliqua patula

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

U.S. - Washington, Northeast Pacific Ocean

Overall Rating

3.366 / 5

Summary

Abundance: Species is not overfished but has low vulnerability to fishing pressure.


Bycatch: Harvest method allows fishers to be highly selective, returning undersized clams or any potential bycatch to the water alive.


Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Pacific Geoduck

Panopea generosa

Method

Farmed

Bottom culture

Location

U.S. - Washington, Northeast Pacific Ocean

Overall Rating

6.29 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Northern Quahog

Mercenaria mercenaria

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

U.S. - New Jersey, Northwest Atlantic Ocean

Overall Rating

3.302 / 5

Summary

Abundance: Stock status unknown. However, it is unlikely fishery severely impacting populations.


Bycatch: Harvest method is selective and incurs minimal to no bycatch.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Northern Quahog

Mercenaria mercenaria

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

U.S. - Maine, Northwest Atlantic Ocean

Overall Rating

3.302 / 5

Summary

Abundance: Stock status unknown. However, it is unlikely fishery severely impacting populations.


Bycatch: Harvest method is selective and incurs minimal to no bycatch.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Ocean Quahog

Arctica islandica

Method

Wild

Dredges

Location

U.S. - Northwest Atlantic Ocean (Ocean quahog fishery)

Overall Rating

3.945 / 5

Summary

Abundance: Population is healthy, and overfishing is not occurring.

 

Bycatch: Discarding and bycatch is a not a concern in this fishery.

 

Management: Fishery has regular stock assessments and management closely follows scientific advice. In addition, management is responsive to changes in stock status and management needs.

 

Habitat: Hydraulic dredges by design have a high level of contact with the seafloor and result in negative impacts on habitat. This fishery has minimal mitigation for habitat impacts at this time.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Northern Razor

Siliqua patula

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

U.S. - Oregon, Northeast Pacific Ocean

Overall Rating

3.366 / 5

Summary

Abundance: Species is not overfished but has low vulnerability to fishing pressure.


Bycatch: Harvest method allows fishers to be highly selective, returning undersized clams or any potential bycatch to the water alive.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Venus

Cyclina sinensis

Method

Farmed

Off-bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Atlantic Surfclam

Spisula solidissima

Method

Wild

Dredges

Location

U.S. - Northwest Atlantic Ocean (Atlantic surfclam fishery)

Overall Rating

3.836 / 5

Summary

Abundance: Population is healthy, and overfishing is not occurring.

 

Bycatch: Discarding and bycatch is a not a concern in this fishery.

 

Management: Fishery has regular stock assessments and management closely follows scientific advice. In addition, management is responsive to changes in stock status and management needs.

 

Habitat: Hydraulic dredges by design have a high level of contact with the seafloor and result in negative impacts on habitat. This fishery has minimal mitigation for habitat impacts at this time.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Venus

Cyclina sinensis

Method

Farmed

Bottom culture

Location

Worldwide

Overall Rating

7.01 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Pacific Geoduck

Panopea generosa

Method

Farmed

Bottom culture

Location

Canada - British Columbia, Northeast Pacific Ocean

Overall Rating

6.34 / 10

Summary

Effluent: Farmed clams are not provided nutrient fertilization. Effluent may be released from the hatchery or nursery phases, but this is not considered to have any negative effects on the environment, and filter-feeding of clams during grow-out is often cited as improving water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms. In isolated cases, anti-predator netting or other plastics may be unintentionally released from the farm, but this is not typical, particularly in regions that dominate clam production globally.

 

Habitat: Farmed clam grow-out operations are primarily located in intertidal or shallow subtidal environments of estuaries, coastal lagoons and bays, all of which are generally considered high- value environments. However, the impact of farmed clam operations on habitat is considered to be minimal, with the main concerns stemming from bio-deposition and harvest.

 

Feed: Clam farming does not require external feed. Clams obtain nutrients by filtering water, which also serves to improve water quality and/or nutrient cycling in the vicinity near farms.

 

Disease: Diseases in farmed clams can occur at every stage of production, from the hatchery to grow- out. Farmed clam grow-out systems are open to the natural environment and there is the possibility of disease exchange between wild and farmed animals. However, biosecurity measures have been put in place from the individual farm level to the intergovernmental and international levels, which reduce the risk of parasite and pathogen infection.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Variety

Clams, Northern Razor

Siliqua patula

Method

Wild

Hand implements

Location

U.S. - Alaska, Northeast Pacific Ocean

Overall Rating

3.366 / 5

Summary

Abundance: Stock has not been formally assessed, but there are no indications that overfishing is occurring.


Bycatch: Harvest method allows fishers to be highly selective, returning undersized clams or any potential bycatch to the water alive.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC)

Variety

Clams, Japanese Corbicula

Corbicula japonica

Method

Farmed

All production methods

Location

Worldwide

Eco-Certification

Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC)

Summary


Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends some, but not all Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) Certified Aquaculture. Click to learn more about how ASC Standards for Aquaculture were benchmarked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) - Clearwater Seafoods Banquereau and Grand Banks Arctic Surf Clam

Variety

Clams, Arctic Surf

Mactromeris polynyma

Method

Wild

Dredges

Location

FAO Area 21 (Atlantic, Northwest)

Eco-Certification

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)
Clearwater Seafoods Banquereau and Grand Banks Arctic Surf Clam

Summary

Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends some, but not all Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries. Click to learn more about how the MSC certification was benchmarked to Ocean Wise. This fishery meets conservation standards to become OWS recommended.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC)

Variety

Clams, Lyrate Hard

Meretrix lyrata

Method

Farmed

All production methods

Location

Worldwide

Eco-Certification

Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC)

Summary

Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends some, but not all Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) Certified Aquaculture. Click to learn more about how ASC Standards for Aquaculture were benchmarked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) - DFA Dutch North Sea Ensis

Variety

Clams, Atlantic Jackknife

Ensis directus

Method

Wild

Dredges

Location

FAO Area 27 (Atlantic, Northeast)

Eco-Certification

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)
DFA Dutch North Sea Ensis

Summary

Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends some, but not all Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries. Click to learn more about how the MSC certification was benchmarked to Ocean Wise. This fishery meets conservation standards to become OWS recommended.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) - Clearwater Seafoods Banquereau and Grand Bank Arctic surf clam Hydraulic Dredge

Variety

Clams, Arctic Surf

Mactromeris polynyma

Method

Wild

Dredges

Location

FAO Area 21 (Atlantic, Northwest)

Eco-Certification

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)
Clearwater Seafoods Banquereau and Grand Bank Arctic surf clam Hydraulic Dredge

Summary

Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends some, but not all Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries. Click to learn more about how the MSC certification was benchmarked to Ocean Wise. This fishery meets conservation standards to become OWS recommended.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) - The Poole Harbour Clam & Cockle Fishery

Variety

Clams, Japanese Carpet Shell

Ruditapes philippinarum

Method

Wild

Dredges

Location

FAO Area 27 (Atlantic, Northeast)

Eco-Certification

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)
The Poole Harbour Clam & Cockle Fishery

Summary

Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends some, but not all Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries. Click to learn more about how the MSC certification was bench-marked to Ocean Wise. This fishery meet conservation standards to become OWS recommended.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC)

Variety

Clams, Pacific Geoduck

Panopea generosa

Method

Farmed

All production methods

Location

Worldwide

Eco-Certification

Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC)

Summary

Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends some, but not all Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) Certified Aquaculture. Click to learn more about how ASC Standards for Aquaculture were benchmarked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC)

Variety

Clams, Asian

Corbicula fluminea

Method

Farmed

All production methods

Location

Worldwide

Eco-Certification

Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC)

Summary


Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends some, but not all Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) Certified Aquaculture. Click to learn more about how ASC Standards for Aquaculture were benchmarked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Canada Organic (Biologique)

Variety

Clams, Softshell

Mya arenaria

Method

Farmed

All production methods

Location

Worldwide

Eco-Certification

Canada Organic (Biologique)

Summary

Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends Canada Organic Certified Shellfish Aquaculture. Click to learn more about how Canadian Organic Standards for shellfish Aquaculture were benchmarked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC)

Variety

Clams, Japanese Carpet Shell

Venerupis spp.

Method

Farmed

All production methods

Location

Worldwide

Eco-Certification

Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC)

Summary

Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends some, but not all Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) Certified Aquaculture. Click to learn more about how ASC Standards for Aquaculture were benchmarked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Canada Organic (Biologique)

Variety

Clams, Northern Quahog

Mercenaria mercenaria

Method

Farmed

All production methods

Location

Worldwide

Eco-Certification

Canada Organic (Biologique)

Summary

Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends Canada Organic Certified Shellfish Aquaculture. Click to learn more about how Canadian Organic Standards for shellfish Aquaculture were benchmarked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Canada Organic (Biologique)

Variety

Clams, Pacific Littleneck

Protothaca staminea

Method

Farmed

All production methods

Location

Worldwide

Eco-Certification

Canada Organic (Biologique)

Summary

Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends Canada Organic Certified Shellfish Aquaculture. Click to learn more about how Canadian Organic Standards for shellfish Aquaculture were benchmarked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Canada Organic (Biologique)

Variety

Clams, Japanese Carpet Shell

Venerupis spp.

Method

Farmed

All production methods

Location

Worldwide

Eco-Certification

Canada Organic (Biologique)

Summary

Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends Canada Organic Certified Shellfish Aquaculture. Click to learn more about how Canadian Organic Standards for shellfish Aquaculture were benchmarked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Canada Organic (Biologique)

Variety

Clams, Pacific Geoduck

Panopea generosa

Method

Farmed

All production methods

Location

Worldwide

Eco-Certification

Canada Organic (Biologique)

Summary

Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends Canada Organic Certified Shellfish Aquaculture. Click to learn more about how Canadian Organic Standards for shellfish Aquaculture were benchmarked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC)

Variety

Clams, Pacific Geoduck

Panopea generosa

Method

Farmed

All production methods

Location

Worldwide

Eco-Certification

Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC)

Summary

Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends some, but not all Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) Certified Aquaculture. Click to learn more about how ASC Standards for Aquaculture were benchmarked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) - Vietnam Ben Tre Clam Hand Gathered

Variety

Clams, Lyrate Hard

Meretrix lyrata

Method

Wild

Miscellaneous gear

Location

FAO Area 71 (Pacific, Western Central)

Eco-Certification

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)
Vietnam Ben Tre Clam Hand Gathered

Summary

Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends some, but not all Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries. Click to learn more about how the MSC certification was benchmarked to Ocean Wise. This fishery meets conservation standards to become OWS recommended.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) - Venetian Wild Harvested Striped Clam (Venus Chamelea gallina)

Variety

Venus, Striped

Chamelea gallina

Method

Wild

Dredges

Location

FAO Area 37 (Mediterranean and Black Sea)

Eco-Certification

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)
Venetian Wild Harvested Striped Clam (Venus Chamelea gallina)

Summary

Rationale: Ocean Wise recommends some, but not all Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries. Click to learn more about how the MSC certification was bench-marked to Ocean Wise. This MSC fishery was recently re-assessed and now meets conservation standards to be Ocean Wise recommended.

Learn more about harvest methods

Under Review

Under Review

Variety

Clams, Pacific Geoduck

Panopea generosa

Method

Wild

Diving

Location

Canada - British Columbia, Northeast Pacific Ocean

Overall Rating

/ 5

Summary

This seafood product is currently under re-assessment as the previous assessment report has reached the end of its life cycle. This product continues to be Ocean Wise recommended during this time.


Abundance: Though there is some uncertainty over stock status this species overfishing is not occurring.


Habitat: Geoduck is generally harvested with hand-held water jets (stingers), which are thought to cause minimal damage to impacted areas, especially because geoducks inhabit sandy, dynamic areas sea floor.

Learn more about harvest methods