Illustration of Chilean Seabass

Chilean Seabass

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Seafood Variety

Harvest Method

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Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) - Heard Island and McDonald islands

Variety

Patagonian toothfish

Dissostichus eleginoides

Method

Wild

Bottom longline, Bottom trawl

Location

Heard Island and McDonald islands

Eco-Certification

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)
Heard Island and McDonald islands

Summary

Ocean Wise recommends some Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries, but not all. Learn more about how the MSC certification was bench-marked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) - Falkland Islands

Variety

Patagonian toothfish

Dissostichus eleginoides

Method

Wild

Longline

Location

Falkland Islands

Eco-Certification

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)
Falkland Islands

Summary

Ocean Wise recommends some Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries, but not all. Learn more about how the MSC certification was bench-marked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) - Macquarie Island toothfish

Variety

Patagonian toothfish

Dissostichus eleginoides

Method

Wild

Bottom longline

Location

Macquarie Island

Eco-Certification

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)
Macquarie Island toothfish

Summary

Ocean Wise recommends some Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries, but not all. Learn more about how the MSC certification was bench-marked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Ocean Wise Recommended

Ocean Wise

Eco-Certification:

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) - South Georgia

Variety

Patagonian toothfish

Dissostichus eleginoides

Method

Wild

Bottom longline

Location

Around the island of South Georgia

Eco-Certification

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)
South Georgia

Summary

Ocean Wise recommends some Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries, but not all. Learn more about how the MSC certification was bench-marked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Variety

Patagonian toothfish

Dissostichus eleginoides

Method

Wild

Deepset longline

Location

Prince Edward and Marion Islands, Chile

Overall Rating

1.6 - 2.3 / 5

Summary

Patagonian toothfish (also known as Chilean seabass) were first targeted in the 1980’s, and expansion of the legal fishery occurred quickly with 40,000 tons landed in 1992, up from 5000 tons in 1983. Illegal fishing is thought to have begun in the 1990’s and persists today despite management measures. Patagonian toothfish is imported to the United States for domestic consumption and re-exportation.

The stock status of Prince Edward and Marion Island fisheries is of high concern due to past exploitation and depletion from illegal fishing. In the Crozet Islands, stock status is unknown but of high concern because the average size of fish caught has decreased significantly over time, implying that individuals are not reaching maturity before being caught. Stocks from Chile are overfished and at high risk of depletion. Only stocks from the Kerguelen Islands are of low concern.

Patagonian toothfish are managed by individual states when the fishery occurs inside exclusive economic zones, as well as by the Convention on the Conservation of Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR), and sometimes by both if boundaries overlap. The fisheries have monitoring measures in place, and regularly collect fishery dependent and independent data. With the exception of the Kerguelen fishery (moderatly effective), management is poor. Chile, Prince Edward and Marion Islands, and Crozet Islands have been ineffective in recovering overfished stocks. In addition, Chile has no bycatch limits in place.

The use of bottom longlines causes the bycatch of endangered or threatened species such as several species of skate, petrel, seabirds, marine mammals, and corals and benthic habitats. Although bycatch of most species represents less than 5% of the catch, the vulnerability of the species caught is of serious concern.

Patagonian toothfish are caught using bottom longlines which can cause moderate amounts of damage to habitat. Although research is being done on the role of Patagonian toothfish in the ecosystem in Kerguelen and Crozet Islands, this research is not used to develop management measures. In Chile, very little ecosystem-based research is taking place.

Learn more about harvest methods

Variety

Patagonian toothfish

Dissostichus eleginoides

Method

Wild

Bottom longline

Location

Area around the islands of Kerguelen and Crozet

Eco-Certification

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)
SARPC Toothfish

Summary

Ocean Wise recommends some Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries, but not all. Learn more about how the MSC certification was bench-marked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods

Variety

Antarctic toothfish

Dissostichus eleginoides

Method

Wild

Longline

Location

Ross sea

Eco-Certification

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)
Ross Sea toothfish longline

Summary

Ocean Wise recommends some Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries, but not all. Learn more about how the MSC certification was bench-marked to Ocean Wise.

Learn more about harvest methods